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Instrument Rating (article 2)

The keys to instrument flying are precise incremental control inputs, patience, and situational awareness.

The training begins with developing the basic instrument skills - straight-and-level, airspeed changes, turns, climbs and descents - all centered on a good instrument scan. Our objective is to make control of the aircraft become almost second nature.

With the basic instrument skills in place, navigation skills are added to the mix with orientation and tracking, and the introduction of holding and approaches. Short and long instrument cross-country flights show how the IFR system works and add practical experience to the instrument training. A variant is the weekend instrument cross-country trip, an "immersion" experience that features several days of instrument navigation and instrument approaches coupled with the opportunity to visit a "destination".

Concurrent with the instrument flight training, we recommend our instrument ground school to help prepare for the knowledge test and to gain a better understanding of instrument procedures and the IFR system.

The training concludes with an emphasis on check-ride preparation and thorough exposure to all of the instrument approaches in the local area that might be flown on the check-ride.

Following the successful completion of the check-ride, the new instrument pilot must continue to use and refine their instrument skills--the instrument scan is one of the most perishable pilot skills. The first "solo" instrument flights should be done in good weather, with the gradual introduction of lower and lower cloud cover until the pilot is working at or near his or her personal weather minimums.
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